Introduction


A Reason And Purpose For Being Here.

These thoughts, which I am presenting, are what happen afterwards, after we put down a good book. Of course, we are filled with many thoughts at that time and, as we all know, there are a lot of good books out there to put down, so I’ve decided to limit my selections to those that I think readers of crime fiction might be interested in and other books, which I believe, might need a little extra attention before they slip into that dark realm of obscurity. The reason for their being here, I hope, will be for what they have contributed to the discussion of writing and what I think will be of general interest to those who want to know more.

Yes, this will be subjective, and I expect most of you will skim through the topics with folded arms while sighing, “Hmm?” And, I have no doubt that this same sigh will be repeated when you realize that so few contemporary crime and mystery writers have been mentioned. Most, many, but not all, will be authors of the past. I, as a person who writes in this genre, find it difficult not to be influenced by what I read in matters of style and substance, so I feel more comfortable in reading the works of those who are more distant in time and/or language. But don’t assume automatically that a writer I have mentioned has passed away. I enjoy picking up a Lee Child’s book and selecting several pages to read at random to refresh myself on the technique of quick pacing or a short story by Ian Rankin to remind myself on how a good tale should be told. But in general, I prefer a Maigret novel by the French author Georges Simenon and the few translated works of Seicho Matsumoto. Both men’s prodigious output I view with great admiration. Of course, these books are read in translation, which I actually enjoy because I find that specific writing style to be clear, simple, and direct. I am sure that a good argument can be made that I am missing the author’s unique style of storytelling, which is probably correct, but it is that clear and simple translated style that I wish to emulate in my own work. As it is, whenever I pick up Matsumoto’s Inspector Imanishi Investigates (Suna no Utsuwa) to clear my head of convoluted sentences and add the pacing of simple words, and start by reading one of his short chapters, I inevitably go on to another chapter, and then another, and another. Well . . . I am sure you know how that ends.

The first couple of Afterwards will include discussions on Julian Symons’ Bloody Murder, an excellent summary of the crime fiction novel’s history; and no doubt a little bit of Dostoevsky. Let’s not forget, his novels were crime novels. And I think a discussion on last century’s critic Edmund Wilson and the earlier Vissarion Belinsky (when author reviews meant something in society) would be interesting. Perry Mason? We haven’t heard that name in a while, other than in reference to the long running TV series. There were actual books written by Mr. Gardner. Wikipedia has over 80 works attributed to him. Most of the novels were published by William Morrow and Company. Perhaps there can be a comment or two regarding his writing style. And maybe Agatha Christi, if I find something to say about her books that hasn’t already been said. And what about our contemporary writers? Don’t worry, I’ll get to a few of those, as well. And, hopefully, any discussion concerning TV crime shows will be limited. I consider most television dramas to be the novel’s evil twin of the entertainment world.

Copyright © 2016 Stephen Randorf